© 2018 Chorley Hedgehog Rescue CIC.   Registered no. 11508065
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Found a hedgehog?

I’ve found a hedgehog, what do I do?

 

If you have found a hedgehog you are concerned about please follow the instructions below:-

  • Use gardening gloves or place an old towel over it and pick it up carefully

  • Look it over to see if there is any blood or obvious injuries (broken limbs or wounds), if yes take it to the nearest Vets for emergency medical treatment

  • Put it in a high sided box (or pet carrier) covered with an old towel or fleece, or alternatively use strips of newspaper

  • Bring it indoors and place it somewhere quiet away from children and pets

  • Fill a hot water bottle and wrap it in a towel so there is a nice gentle heat coming through and put that in the bottom of the box with the hedgehog, ensuring it has room to get off the bottle and making sure the bottle is kept warm (if allowed to go cold it will do more harm than good)

  • If you can weigh the hedgehog using kitchen scales, that will be very helpful for us to estimate it's age.  Hedgehogs must be at least 850g to survive Winter hibernation, if your hog is smaller it will need to be rescued.

Warning signs to look out for that suggest your hedgehog is in need of help:-

  • Out during the middle of the day (foraging at dawn and dusk is normal) 

  • Circling, staggering or difficulties walking

  • Lying on its side

  • Flies around it or on it (check for white fly eggs and maggots)

  • Small hoglets out on their own constantly squeaking (weighing less than 300g)

We are extremely busy right now and at maximum capacity. 

Here is a list of other hedgehog rescues in Lancashire that may be able to help.

PLEASE do NOT leave hedgehogs out during the day!

Any hedgehog that is not moving or has been out during daylight for any length of time is in URGENT need of IMMEDIATE help​.
Please do NOT leave hedgehogs to 'monitor' them, or put them 'back under a bush', they may need life-saving medical attention.